Updates from: 06/24/2021 03:14:42
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Microsoft.PowerShell.Core About Arrays (5.1) https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/commits/staging/reference/5.1/Microsoft.PowerShell.Core/About/about_Arrays.md
array while the array index is less than 4, type:
$a = 0..9 $i=0 while($i -lt 4) {
- $a[$i];
+ $a[$i]
$i++ } ```
$a = @(
"`$a rank: $($a.Rank)" "`$a length: $($a.Length)"
-"`$a length: $($a.Length)"
+"`$a[2] length: $($a[2].Length)"
"Process `$a[2][1]: $($a[2][1].ProcessName)" ```
Microsoft.PowerShell.Core About Alias Provider (7.0) https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/commits/staging/reference/7.0/Microsoft.PowerShell.Core/About/about_Alias_Provider.md
path.
> [!NOTE] > PowerShell uses aliases to allow you a familiar way to work with provider
-> paths. Commands such as `dir` and `ls` are now aliases for
-> [Get-ChildItem](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Get-ChildItem), `cd` is
-> an alias for
+> paths. Commands such as `dir` and `ls` are now aliases on Windows and `dir`
+> on Linux and macOS for [Get-ChildItem](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Get-ChildItem),
+> `cd` is an alias for
> [Set-Location](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Set-Location). and `pwd` > is an alias for > [Get-Location](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Get-Location).
Microsoft.PowerShell.Core About Aliases (7.0) https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/commits/staging/reference/7.0/Microsoft.PowerShell.Core/About/about_Aliases.md
If you create `word` as the alias for Microsoft Office Word, you can type
## Built in aliases PowerShell includes a set of built-in aliases, including `cd` and `chdir` for
-the `Set-Location` cmdlet, and `ls` and `dir` for the `Get-ChildItem` cmdlet.
+the `Set-Location` cmdlet, `ls` and `dir` on Windows and `dir` on Linux and
+macOS for the `Get-ChildItem` cmdlet.
To get all the aliases on the computer, including the built-in aliases, type:
Microsoft.PowerShell.Core About Arrays (7.0) https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/commits/staging/reference/7.0/Microsoft.PowerShell.Core/About/about_Arrays.md
array while the array index is less than 4, type:
$a = 0..9 $i=0 while($i -lt 4) {
- $a[$i];
+ $a[$i]
$i++ } ```
$a = @(
"`$a rank: $($a.Rank)" "`$a length: $($a.Length)"
-"`$a length: $($a.Length)"
+"`$a[2] length: $($a[2].Length)"
"Process `$a[2][1]: $($a[2][1].ProcessName)" ```
Microsoft.PowerShell.Core About Alias Provider (7.1) https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/commits/staging/reference/7.1/Microsoft.PowerShell.Core/About/about_Alias_Provider.md
path.
> [!NOTE] > PowerShell uses aliases to allow you a familiar way to work with provider
-> paths. Commands such as `dir` and `ls` are now aliases for
-> [Get-ChildItem](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Get-ChildItem), `cd` is
-> an alias for
+> paths. Commands such as `dir` and `ls` are now aliases on Windows and `dir`
+> on Linux and macOS for [Get-ChildItem](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Get-ChildItem),
+> `cd` is an alias for
> [Set-Location](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Set-Location). and `pwd` > is an alias for > [Get-Location](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Get-Location).
Microsoft.PowerShell.Core About Aliases (7.1) https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/commits/staging/reference/7.1/Microsoft.PowerShell.Core/About/about_Aliases.md
If you create `word` as the alias for Microsoft Office Word, you can type
## Built in aliases PowerShell includes a set of built-in aliases, including `cd` and `chdir` for
-the `Set-Location` cmdlet, and `ls` and `dir` for the `Get-ChildItem` cmdlet.
+the `Set-Location` cmdlet, `ls` and `dir` on Windows and `dir` on Linux and
+macOS for the `Get-ChildItem` cmdlet.
To get all the aliases on the computer, including the built-in aliases, type:
Microsoft.PowerShell.Core About Arrays (7.1) https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/commits/staging/reference/7.1/Microsoft.PowerShell.Core/About/about_Arrays.md
array while the array index is less than 4, type:
$a = 0..9 $i=0 while($i -lt 4) {
- $a[$i];
+ $a[$i]
$i++ } ```
$a = @(
"`$a rank: $($a.Rank)" "`$a length: $($a.Length)"
-"`$a length: $($a.Length)"
+"`$a[2] length: $($a[2].Length)"
"Process `$a[2][1]: $($a[2][1].ProcessName)" ```
Microsoft.PowerShell.Core About Alias Provider (7.2) https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/commits/staging/reference/7.2/Microsoft.PowerShell.Core/About/about_Alias_Provider.md
path.
> [!NOTE] > PowerShell uses aliases to allow you a familiar way to work with provider
-> paths. Commands such as `dir` and `ls` are now aliases for
-> [Get-ChildItem](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Get-ChildItem), `cd` is
-> an alias for
+> paths. Commands such as `dir` and `ls` are now aliases on Windows and `dir`
+> on Linux and macOS for [Get-ChildItem](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Get-ChildItem),
+> `cd` is an alias for
> [Set-Location](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Set-Location). and `pwd` > is an alias for > [Get-Location](xref:Microsoft.PowerShell.Management.Get-Location).
Microsoft.PowerShell.Core About Aliases (7.2) https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/commits/staging/reference/7.2/Microsoft.PowerShell.Core/About/about_Aliases.md
If you create `word` as the alias for Microsoft Office Word, you can type
## Built in aliases PowerShell includes a set of built-in aliases, including `cd` and `chdir` for
-the `Set-Location` cmdlet, and `ls` and `dir` for the `Get-ChildItem` cmdlet.
+the `Set-Location` cmdlet, `ls` and `dir` on Windows and `dir` on Linux and
+macOS for the `Get-ChildItem` cmdlet.
To get all the aliases on the computer, including the built-in aliases, type:
Microsoft.PowerShell.Core About Arrays (7.2) https://github.com/MicrosoftDocs/PowerShell-Docs/commits/staging/reference/7.2/Microsoft.PowerShell.Core/About/about_Arrays.md
array while the array index is less than 4, type:
$a = 0..9 $i=0 while($i -lt 4) {
- $a[$i];
+ $a[$i]
$i++ } ```
$a = @(
"`$a rank: $($a.Rank)" "`$a length: $($a.Length)"
-"`$a length: $($a.Length)"
+"`$a[2] length: $($a[2].Length)"
"Process `$a[2][1]: $($a[2][1].ProcessName)" ```